Are you German enough for these 7 typical German foods?

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7 Typical German Foods

 

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1. Saumagen

A Pigs’ stomach. Before man and woman invented artificial casing, the Neanderthal, Germans and well… everybody used cleansed intestines or stomach. Fill that empty pigs stomach with all of its own non-sellable body parts like: spleen, liver, lung, trachea, ears, feet, and face parts. In the end, you have a high-class German delicatessen called Saumagen. More about inside an authentic Saumagen

 

 

2. Blood sausage

One of the greatest things about blood sausage is that it looks nearly the same before and after ingestion. Freshly dripped pig blood gets naturally thicker as it cools. Add a few chunks of diced lard and viola! You have typical German blood sausage on a typical German slaughter plate: “Schlachtplatte”.

 

 

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3. Sulze

Only eaten in the winter, you can find almost anything and everything in a homemade Sulze: Pork ears, Piglet feet, chocks, pork nose, cheeks, hooves and co. The best part about Sulze? The pickles and German bread that are usually served as a side. Here is a good head cheese recipe.

 

 

4. Schmalz

Just imagine, instead of getting your glass of tap water, dinner rolls and butter: all you get is pumpernickel and a small tub of lard to begin your wonderful date in the deepest of The Black Forest. Schmalz is fancied lard. Local German butchers usually make their own home-made Schmalz by adding some chives, diced apples and onions into the mix.

 

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5. Rinderzunge

The trick with eating cow tongue is to not mistakenly chew on your own. It feels the same. It tastes the same and heck… you wouldn’t even notice the difference if you were on painkillers. Preparing the tongue itself is an underpaid job, as the taste buds need to be freed of anything not edible (which is basically plaque build-up on the tongue). Secondly, it takes forever to cook the tongue because it is so tender. Lastly, cover up the tongue with any and every sauce you have in your cupboard so you can split-second-forget what you just shoved in your mouth.

 

 

6. Speck

This food can be camouflaged well onto a cheese platter. It’s tainted white color and consistency is similar to that of American Swiss cheese. Yet, speck is nonetheless; fat. Pure stomach fat that once hung just inches off the ground before the Pig named bacon trotted his way into the slaughter house.

 

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7. Mettwurst

Raw. Minced. Meat. Ick. With a bit of diced onions. Who thinks of this crap? Similar to liver sausage or Teewurst, its cousin Mettwurst was never as successful as its relatives. The typical German would rather eat something with a bit for adventure put into it… such as Saumagen.

 

 

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